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       Garfield


    Advanced Placement English

     

    Welcome to AP English.  This is a freshman college English course and will be conducted as such.  We will spend our year preparing for the AP English Literature and Composition exam to be administered in May.  This is a reading, writing, and discussion intensive class.  So you MUST be prepared and carrying on an in-depth discussion of the literature!

     

    Unlike last year, you will once again experience 39-minute classes, which results in every minute a precious one.  We have six marking periods , therefore your cumulative average is based upon 8 grades (a mid-term and research paper) rather than six (subject to change).  

     

    Some information about how this class "works":

     

    1.        The first week or two we will cover the required reading assignments from the summer.  Next, we will cover the college application process and essay writing and, until May, our focus will be the reading and writing of novels and poetry in preparation for the AP exam.  Following the exam students will be required to complete a research paper per graduation requirement.

     

    2.       This program is built around the college concept of seminar type learning, which means an intelligent dialogue of the literature and poetry read.  Every member must be prepared each day to uphold his or her end of the conversation.  Preparation means reading the material and using a higher order thought process for interpretation.  Laziness or non-participation will hurt you as well as the rest of the class!

     

    3.       Every assignment is due on the day it is due period!  If there are extenuating circumstances come and see me before homeroom, don't wait until class because assignments are due during your class period not a minute later.  Most assignments are given weeks in advance; therefore plan ahead.

     

    There are only four or five grades per making period, so each assignment is extremely important to your success.  Long term projects (like the research paper) will be broken-up into pieces, in addition, to the grade earned for the whole project.  Some assignments are graded zero or 100; the purpose is that I am more concerned that the assignment is completed for the class period discussion.  Other sources for grades come from your daily journal writing assignments, extra book report, quizzes, tests, class participation and any extra credit that may be offered.

     

    English 9

     

       Today is the first day of your high school career.  Everything you do, or choose not to do, will be recorded in your school transcript. 

     Are you planning to go on to college after high school?  …the military? ...the workforce?  Do you want to rank in the top 10% of your class to ensure scholarships?  Do you want a trade (welder, hairdresser, nail technician, large equipment operator)?

     The choices you make start today and will have an effect on the avenues available to you after high school.  Make the most of your time here join clubs, music, sports, art, student government and so much more!

     Our classes are 81 minutes in length.  Throughout the course of those 81 minutes you will be expected to be attentive and participate in the class lesson.  Class lessons will vary day to day and will include vocabulary development, close reading of literature and discussion of read material, writing and grammar development, in addition to a research project, poetry, and journal writing.  

     I don’t like to do “busy work” therefore I will not give you “busy work”…EVERYTHING YOU DO COUNTS toward your grade!   Grades are divided into four categories:  homework, quizzes, tests and participation …each is worth 25 percent of your grade.

     The materials that you need every day for this class are as follows:

    ü 3” binder (you will use this year to year grades 9 – 11), Loose leaf paper…preferably college rule, Dividers for the binder– at least 8, A package of 1 ½ or 2” Post-it notes, Blue or black pens, Pencil (for tests), You will need to purchase a Sadlier-Oxford Vocabulary book from the Book Store located across from the cafeteria.

    As a teacher, I am enthusiastic, intelligent, and try to provide interesting and innovative methods to learning.  I am proud to be your teacher and put a great deal of thought and planning into each lesson that I prepare.  The 81 minutes that you are in my class are mine to use as I think best.  I will extend respect toward you and I expect you to do the same for not only me as your teacher, but toward all persons that pass through my door.

    I have an “open door” policy.  My door is always open to you for help, assistance or just to talk!  Beyond the school day I can always be reached at rbevivino@westmorelandschool.org.

    I look forward, with your cooperation, to making this one of your best memories spent at Westmoreland.  Together we can have an enjoyable, rewarding, even occasionally exciting time together.
     
     


             English 10

     

    Welcometo your Sophomore Year of High School.

    Our focus for the year is preparation for your future.  There are 3 marking periods, a midterm and final exam.

     YOU are responsible for the grades you earn.  Report card averages are a combination of homework, test averages, quiz averages, project grades, journals, vocabulary assignments and participation.  Each assignment is extremely important to your success.  Long term projects (like the research paper) will be broken up into pieces, in addition, to the grade earned for the whole project.  Some assignments are graded 100 or zero; the purpose is that I am more concerned that the assignment is completed for the class period discussion.  Other sources for grades come from your journal writing assignments, quizzes, tests, vocabulary assignments, study guides, class participation and any extra credit that may be offered.

     Homework is 35% of the grade, Tests are 35% and 30% is reserved for class participation per board policy.

     Survival notes:

     1. If you had an emergency and did not complete your assignment for the class period, see me before first period and we will discuss your options as not to receive a zero.  Do not wait until we are in class to plead your case.

    2. If you are absent it is your responsibility to see me for the material missed.  Do not wait until the class period has started to ask.

     

    3. All homework is due at the beginning of the class period unless indicated.

     

    4.Only blue or black ink is to be used for assignments.  A pencil will only be used for scan tron for the midterm and the final.

     

    5.Please eliminate notebook curly edges of papers before handing them in.

    What can you expect from me?

     As a teacher, I am enthusiastic, intelligent, and try to provide interesting and innovative methods to learning.  I am proud to be your teacher and put a great deal of thought and planning into each lesson that I prepare.  The 39 minutes that you are in my class are mine to use as I think best.  I will extend respect toward you and I expect you to do the same for not only me as your teacher, but toward all persons that pass through my door.

     I have an “open door” policy.  My door is always open to you for help, assistance or just to talk!  Beyond the school day I can always be reached at rbevivino@westmorelandschool.org.

     I look forward, with your cooperation, to making this one of your best memories spent at Westmoreland.  Together we can have an enjoyable, rewarding, even occasionally exciting time together before  you embark on your life beyond our high school corridors.

     
     Creative Writing
     

     Course Content

    This course focuses on writing as an art form. The curriculum guide is designed to help teachers plan a program that encourages students to develop creative ideas and express them through writing in a variety of forms and genres.

    The genres of creative writing featured in this curriculum are poetry, short stories, fairy tales, children’s books and cartoons. The Final Project offers the opportunity for students to explore one of the forms more in-depth, independently.

    The content of Creative Writing can be summarized in the following way:

    • The course must be based on the foundational and specific learning objectives that have been set for Creative Writing.
    • In order to develop these objectives, the course must focus on the language processes of reading and writing, although students will also be engaged in speaking and listening as they discuss their own writing, their peers' writing, and reading selections.
    • The course must include poetry, short stories, fairy tales, children’s books and cartoons. How the teacher organizes the course is optional. (Two possible options are explained in this guide.)

    Objectives

    Students will:

    • develop abilities to write creatively and expressively
    • practice the behaviors of committed creative writers
    • develop knowledge of creative writing and appropriate vocabulary for discussing creative writing
    • recognize writing as a constructive, meaningful process
    • recognize reading as an active, constructive process
    • practice the behaviors of effective, deliberate readers
    • recognize the contribution of literature to cultures and societies
    • recognize that talk is an important tool for communicating, thinking, and learning
    • practice the behaviors of effective speakers
    • speak fluently and confidently in a variety of situations for a variety of purposes and audiences
    • recognize listening as an active, constructive process
    • practice the behaviors of effective listeners
    • listen effectively in a variety of situations for a variety of purposes.

    Specific Learning Objectives

    Learning objectives are specific objectives that can be applied to a particular lesson or unit/module. Specific learning objectives related to each foundational objective are listed below. The teacher should also develop additional learning objectives that are a further breakdown of these, as they apply to the activities selected.

    Specific learning objectives for Creative Writing  include the following:

    Writing

    • Develop their abilities to write creatively and expressively
      • use writing to explore unique personal perspectives
      • use writing to explore ideas in a new way
      • manipulate language for poetic and aesthetic purposes
      • use language as a vehicle for thought
      • write to express understanding
      • write to achieve unity
      • write to engage a reader’s interest
    • Practice the behaviors of committed creative writers
      • understand that the process of writing is a process of finding the internal truth of subject matter, rather than recording external details
      • keep a journal of ideas, reflections, and notes on writing
      • explore personal unique creative processes
      • apply knowledge of literature and literary traditions to writing
      • engage in a process of creative problem solving
      • see the development of a piece of writing as unrefined and require many revisions
      • understand the importance of revision and understand that revision involves seeing a piece of writing a new way
      • confer with peers and teachers
    • Develop knowledge of creative writing and appropriate vocabulary for discussing creative writing
      • understand and write from various points of view
      • understand and use literary devices
      • explore connections between language use, theme, and meaning
      • understand the unique characteristics of poetry, short stories, fairy tales, children’s books and cartooning
      • learn appropriate conventions that apply to a variety of writing genres including poetry, fiction, plays, and nonfiction
      • experiment with a variety of writing genres including poetry, short stories, fairy tales, children’s books and cartooning
    • Recognize writing as a constructive, meaningful process
      • recognize the value of what is known as the writing process
      • use the writing process to organize thoughts and explore ideas through writing
      • use appropriate pre-writing strategies
      • develop ideas into draft form
      • revise by adding, deleting, rearranging, or expressing the idea in a different way
      • edit, proofread, and present writing

    Reading

    • Recognize reading as an active, constructive process
      • read for pleasure
      • read critically
      • read to find meaning and interpret
    • Practice the behaviors of effective, strategic readers
      • attempt to understand an author’s purpose and intentions
      • recognize patterns of organization and structures
      • recognize various literary uses of language
      • withhold judgment of literary works until adequate information is obtained to arrive at an informed personal interpretation
      • demonstrate an open-minded attitude toward new and unfamiliar work

     

    Speaking

    • Recognize that talk is an important tool for communicating, thinking, and learning
      • speak to clarify and extend thinking
      • speak to express understanding
      • speak to share thoughts, opinions, and feelings
      • speak to build relationships and a sense of community
    • Practice the behaviors of effective speakers
      • recognize and adjust verbal and nonverbal elements in keeping with purpose, audience needs, and individual cultural and linguistic background
    • Speak fluently and confidently in a variety of situations for a variety of purposes and audiences
      • practice the roles of group members including: chairing, participating, moderating and reporting
      • prepare a reading of a personal composition

    Listening

    • Recognize listening as an active, constructive process
      • recognize listening as an active process which requires listeners to:
        • anticipate a message and set a purpose
        • attend
        • seek and check understanding by making connections, and by making and confirming predictions and inferences
        • interpret and summarize
        • evaluate and analyze
    • Practice the behaviors of effective listeners
      • recognize factors that interfere with effective listening, including personal biases
      • be sensitive to ideas and purpose when listening
      • provide appropriate feedback
      • respond personally, critically, creatively, and empathetically
    • Listen effectively in a variety of situations for a variety of purposes
      • listen for personal pleasure and aesthetic satisfaction
      • listen to: understand and learn, analyze and evaluate, empathize and make connections with others
      • assess the overall effectiveness of group discussions, readings, and interviews

    Classroom Environment

    It is essential that student writers work in an atmosphere that inspires confidence, knowing that they can take risks without fear of criticism or ridicule. All honest creative endeavors involve risk-taking, especially for students developing self-concepts. Many students will find their voices in an atmosphere where risk-taking is encouraged and respected.

    It is imperative that students behave respectfully toward one another.

    During discussion periods students exchange ideas, consult one another, and share their writing. The sound of constructive conversation is healthy during these times. However, some classroom time should be set aside as quiet time, to enable students to reflect, deliberate, and concentrate. The classroom environment should be predictable and consistent. 

     

     

     

     

     

     



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